Voices of the Athabasca
Janice Pitman, Athabasca area farmer
Canadian geese noisily proclaim their residence on Little Pine Creek for the summer. A White-throated sparrow sings clearly and sweetly O Canada, Canada, Canada. Tender pale green leaves speak of the strength of the earth to cleanse and renew. My mind wanders back to my youth as I ran barefoot through the woods and fields.
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Jimmy Ochiese, Foothills Ojiway shaman
I will speak on the environment, and also about life that we have on earth and the connection we have on earth, and also the spirit that we have... all those things mean something here on earth - the truth of life.
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Cleo Reese
I spoke with Jimmy Cree, a member of the Fort McMurray First Nation, this morning when I picked him up hitchhiking to Fort McMurray and he spoke about the time he spent as a trapper. He remembers many springs when he and other trappers would go beaver trapping along the banks of the Athabasca River.
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Bob Cameron
In the summer of 1970, I was employed as a labourer by National Parks in Jasper. Late in the summer we began mixing the calcium chloride and fine gravel to be used on the roads in the winter. We broke bags of calcium chloride over the edge of the loader bucket each time the loader scooped a bucket from one pile to the other. The gravel pile was along the Athabasca just upstream of the airport.
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Alice Rigney, Fort Chipewyan elder
I was born on the shores of Lake Athabasca, delivered by my maternal grandmother and raised on the banks of the Athabasca River at a Dene village, called Jackfish. My memories are happy ones as most childhood memories are, a large extended family and many other river families were the people I remember.
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Connie Bresnahan
I live near Hinton, at the upriver end of the Athabasca River Basin. It is a beautiful place to live, directly adjacent to the front ranges of the Rocky Mountains, in the upper foothills where the Athabasca River leaves Jasper National Park on its long journey north as a tributary of the Arctic Ocean Drainage Basin.
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