Healing Walk 2011
Keepers of the Athabasca
  
For more voices opposing the largest bitumen mine ever proposed, see below.

We are First Nations, Metis, Inuit, environmental groups, and Watershed citizens working together for the protection of water, land and air, and thus for all living things today and tomorrow in the Athabasca River Watershed.

OUR MISSION
To unite the peoples of the Athabasca River and Lake Watershed to secure and protect water and watershed lands for ecological, social, cultural and community health and well being.

BECOME A KEEPER OF THE ATHABASCA: HOW TO DONATE
Help protect the Athabasca Watershed: become a Keeper and support the work of the Keepers of the Athabasca. We are now actively seeking donations to support a number of projects around the Athabasca Watershed. Please visit our donations page and select a membership or specific project to receive your support. Note that you can donate to the Keepers of the Athabasca or our parent organization, Keepers of the Water. Thank you.
» Donate to the Keepers of the Athabasca
» Donate to the Keepers of the Water

WORKSHOPS: FLOWING INTO RIGHT RELATIONSHIP
Keepers of the Athabasca offers a number of interactive and informative community workshops: The "Blanket Exercise", United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Truth and Reconciliation, Exploring the Treaties, Indigenous Water Governance, and the Community Climate Action. For more information or to book a workshop, please contact Jule Asterisk.
» Download the "Flowing into Right Relationship" Workshops poster (700KB PDF)
» Download our Community Climate Action brochure (460KB PDF)

BROCHURES
» Download our Keepers of the Athabasca brochure (1.9MB PDF)
» Download our I'm a Keeper brochure (2.1MB PDF)
Newsletters
What's New
RELEASE: Speaking out against gravel pits in the Tawatinaw valley
October 15, 2018
The Tawatinaw valley and watershed, with a rich history and cherished by all who live in and around it, is now threatened by two proposed massive gravel and sand pits. The landowner and Sustainable Developments Commercial Services (SDC) are putting their applications to the Alberta government, and a number of local area residents are speaking out.
» Speaking out against gravel pits in the Tawatinaw valley (313KB PDF)

RELEASE: True Cost Accounting would tell the whole story on proposed Teck/Frontier mine
September 24, 2018
The Joint Review Panel convenes on September 25, 2018 to review Teck's application for a brand new bitumen mine in Alberta. This, the largest and most northerly mine yet, is right next to endangered UNESCO world heritage site, the Wood Buffalo National Park, and the application runs over 4000 pages. It is contested by First Nations, environmental groups, and other concerned citizens. As Canada looks for that sweet spot between energy development and environmental protection, we need True Cost Accounting to help us get the whole story. Including all of the costs in the accounting for any project delivers its 'true cost': not just costs for project proponents, but real costs for Canadians today, and also the costs for future generations. Click the images below for a larger view.
» True Cost Accounting would tell the whole story on proposed Teck/Frontier mine (360KB PDF)




RELEASE: Solar power: Our allegiance to land, air, water, and sun
August 13, 2018
Keepers of the Athabasca is partnering with Sucker Creek First Nation and the Society of High Prairie Regional Environmental Action Committee to put a solar installation on the Treaty 8 Building in Sucker Creek First Nation. This clean energy project will save thousands of dollars each year, and initiates planning for Phase 2, accessing Alberta's Indigenous Solar Program to design and build solar for a good part of the larger SCFN community. Click the photos below for a larger view, or review the original Request for Proposals (now closed).
» Solar power: Our allegiance to land, air, water, and sun (241KB PDF)
» SCFN Solar Contract: Information for Bidders (386KB PDF)
» SCFN Solar Contract: RFP Instructions (98KB PDF)
» SCFN Solar Contract: Draft Services Contract (389KB PDF)
» SCFN Solar Contract: Cost Appendix (91KB XLSX)



RELEASE: Condolences - 10 years after international tailings duck disaster
April 30, 2018
On the anniversary of 1,600 ducks' death in Syncrude's tailings pond, we wish to express our sincere condolences for the thousands of other lives lost in tailing ponds, including at least 27 black bears, 67 deer, 31 red foxes and 21 coyotes (between 2000 and 2008 only), along with moose, muskrats, beavers, voles, martens, more ducks, geese, at least 31 blue herons (2015), other birds, and people, as well as the unknown and unreported deaths of other animals large and small. Keepers of the Athabasca continues to work hard to oppose new bitumen extraction, actively fundraising to provide tools for community based monitoring and advocating for an independent human health study to examine the confirmed human cancer clusters in northeastern Alberta.
» Condolences - 10 years after international tailings duck disaster (374KB PDF)

SAVE THE DATE: Keepers of the Athabasca Annual General Meeting June 1-3
April 13, 2018
The Keepers of the Athabasca Annual General Meeting will be held June 1-3, 2018 at Long Lake Outdoor Education Centre, with blanket exercise facilitator training on June 3-4. For more information and to register, contact Jule Asterisk at 780-805-1709 or keepers.communications@gmail.com.
» POSTER: Keepers of the Athabasca Annual General Meeting (471KB JPG)

NEWSLETTER: Keepers of the Athabasca, March 2018
March 31, 2018
The March 2018 issue of the Keepers of the Athabasca newsletter features updates on the solar partnership with Sucker Creek First Nation, the Flowing into Right Relationship river journey and workshop series, and the Swan Hills Treatment Centre file, as well as an announcement for the 2018 Healing Gathering for Land and Water to be held August 23-26.
» Keepers of the Athabasca Newsletter, March 2018 (1.1MB PDF)

RELEASE: Contamination questions on two hazardous sites: Swan Hills and Faust's Toxic Park
March 26, 2018
First Nations, residents, businesses, and municipalities want to know: does contamination from the Swan Hills (hazardous waste) Treatment Centre (SHTC) reach us around the Lesser Slave Lake area? Keepers of the Athabasca successfully challenged the Alberta Environment Approval for this facility in 2015. Now, almost three years and two meetings later, Keepers of the Athabasca participated in removing lake sediment core samples from Lesser Slave Lake, near the mouth of the Swan River on March 12, 2018, assisted by a guide from Swan River First Nation, and environmental consultant Theo Charette for SUEZ.
» Contamination questions on two hazardous sites (742KB PDF)

OPEN LETTER: Concerns regarding the Mine Financial Security Program and implementation of the Tailings Management Framework for the Athabasca Oil Sands
January 8, 2018
Keepers of the Athabasca (Keepers) have serious liability concerns, including health, financial and environmental, with Alberta's Mine Financial Security Program (MFSP) and the implementation of the Tailings Management Framework (TMF). In this letter we briefly detail these concerns and strongly recommend specific actions on the part of the Government of Alberta (GoA) and Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) to rectify the untenable situation we find ourselves in. These are not new issues, but ones that Keepers has engaged in with the GoA and the oil sands industry for several years. It is long past time for these issues to be rectified, as Alberta's Auditor General (AG) and many others have stated.
» OPEN LETTER: Concerns regarding the Mine Financial Security Program and implementation of the Tailings Management Framework for the Athabasca Oil Sands (347KB PDF)

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The Keepers of the Athabasca depends upon our many sponsors and volunteers who make our activities possible. Thank you for helping to keep the Athabasca!
» Full sponsor list